RCTC Nursing Honor Society Inducts Associate Degree Nursing Students

(Rochester, MN) Rochester Community and Technical College welcomed 17 Associate Degree Nursing students into the Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society at an induction ceremony held today.

 

The RCTC Alpha Delta Nu inductees include: Christa Danae Clarey, Rochester, MN; Cindy Le Dang, Rochester, MN; Emily Anastasia Dick, St. Charles, MN; Jessica Lynn Foster, Hayfield, MN; Rachel Susan Goldsmith, Rochester, MN; Bradley John Haugen Jr., Rochester, MN; Lauren Marie Holland, Rochester, MN; Jessica Lynn Jensen, Rochester, MN; Angela Jeanine Martin, Rochester, MN; Nicholas Michael Matti, Hayfield, MN; Asha Kadar Osman, Rochester, MN; Melissa Ann Passe, St. Charles, MN; Rachel Ellen Rhody, Rochester, MN; Laura Lee Schley, Rochester, MN; Margaret Kelly Sciallis, Rochester, MN; Jerrica Noel Stromberg, Rochester, MN; Heather Rose Wirt, Lewiston, MN.

 

“By strengthening professionalism, scholastic excellence, and caring intentionality in themselves, they help to ensure that their patients will receive safe, compassionate care in a culturally competent manner,” said Elizabeth Wirt, DNP, RN, RCTC Nursing Instructor and Alpha Delta Nu Faculty Advisor. Wirt adds, “These AD Nursing students will use their professional knowledge and skill to ensure their patients gain the knowledge needed for personal health and safety.”

 

RCTC nursing students who have volunteered to hold office in the present semester include: President - Rachel Rhody; Vice President - Laura Larson; Secretary/Treasurer - Cindy Dang; Liaison Officer - Laura Schley; and Skills Lab/Mentor Coordinator - Asha Osman.

 

Inductees were awarded a pin, certificate and honor cords to be worn at commencement. RCTC’s Delta Alpha chapter of Alpha Delta Nu was granted chapter status in October of 2015.

 

The Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society recognizes the academic excellence of students in the Associate Degree Nursing major. Students applying to the Alpha Delta Nu Nursing Honor Society must have a 3.0 GPA or better in all of their nursing classes and demonstrate conduct that reflects integrity and professionalism in all clinical areas. The Alpha Delta Nu Nursing society encourages the pursuit of advanced degrees in the profession of nursing as well as continuing education as a life-long professional responsibility. Members of the society also participate in the recruitment of qualified individuals into the profession of nursing.

 

 

Established in 1915, RCTC is the largest higher education provider in the fastest-growing city in Minnesota, serving more than 8,000 students a year in credit courses and nearly 3,700 in non-credit continuing and workforce education programs. RCTC combines the best in liberal arts, technical, and life-long learning with more than 70 credit-based programs and over 100 credential options. RCTC’s expansive 518-acre campus includes university partnerships, a diverse student body, and a vibrant student life program. RCTC provides a unique learning environment that offers the feel of a four-year university campus with the commitment to access and opportunity of a two-year college.

 

 

The Minnesota State system consists of 37 colleges and universities with over 16,000 employees offering nearly 4,000 educational programs to nearly 400,000 students. It is the fifth-largest higher education system in the United States.

 

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RCTC is a member of the Minnesota State system.

 

Our View: UMR will lose a champion when Kaler goes

The University of Minnesota Rochester has been around for about 12 years.

 

Eric Kaler has been president of the University of Minnesota for seven of those years and has championed the innovative (read: experimental) Rochester campus throughout his tenure.

 

There have been lean years for UMR enrollment and more promising years; “it appears to be in growth mode now. It’s a tiny project, just a speck on Goldy Gopher’s back amid the totality of what the University of Minnesota is about. Systemwide, it has 44,500 students, about 71 percent of them in the Twin Cities. Rochester has fewer than a thousand students. It was only five years ago that it produced its first graduating class.

 

 

Though plans are in the works for building a campus, a master plan for the U of M that’s in the final phase of drafting calls for only modest enrollment growth here.

 

So Kaler’s announcement Friday that he plans to retire at the end of the 2018-19 year is reason to look ahead as well as appreciate his contributions. The U of M has enjoyed a period of moderate growth, fiscal restraint and refocusing of mission during his tenure. He’s proven to be a prodigious fundraiser and he’ll continue that for a year after he steps down on July 1 next year.

 

There have been personnel debacles along the way, including the departure of former Athletic Director Norwood Teague in 2015 amid sexual harassment allegations, and Kaler has had his critics at the Capitol. As he said Friday, “my tenure already exceeds the national average,” which says as much about the fraught demands of the top job at a major university as it does about Kaler.

 

“This is an incredibly demanding job … and as proud and confident of my contributions and ability as I am, I also know that the University will benefit from a fresh perspective.”

 

This is always true, in every line of work. But it likely will give UMR boosters in Rochester reason for pause as well. UMR has a new chancellor, Lori Carrell, who took over in February from the founding chancellor, Stephen Lehmkuhle, who shaped the mission and vision for the branch campus.

 

Carrell clearly is committed to and energized by that mission, and Kaler and the Board of Regents remain committed and engaged. Though Rochester isn’t represented on the board for the first time in many years, the Regents met in Rochester in March and expressed support for what’s happening here. UMR recently confirmed that it will lease space in One Discovery Square, the Destination Medical Center building going up on Second Avenue Southwest, and preliminary work continues in the area where UMR hopes to develop a campus.

 

Still, if change at the top gives a “fresh perspective,” it also means UMR and every other unit of the University will need to make a fresh, persuasive case for what they do, how it contributes to the broader institutional mission and also how it makes sense for the bottom line.

 

Rochester and UMR have a great case to make to whoever takes over Kaler’s chair in Morrill Hall. It’s not too early to start thinking that through.

RCTC AWARDED MINNESOTA JOB SKILLS PARTNERSHIP GRANT

(Rochester, MN) Rochester Community and Technical College has been awarded a Minnesota Job Skills Partnership (MJSP) grant from the Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) of $371,922 to train cybersecurity professionals at Mayo Clinic. MJSP allocates grants to educational institutions who are working to expand employment opportunities in growth sectors within Minnesota’s economy to keep high-quality jobs in the state.

Partnership grants work with businesses, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations to train or retrain workers, to develop and deliver custom training specific to the organizations’ needs.  Each grant requires a one-to-one cash match or in-kind contribution from the participating business(es), putting the project over $750,000. 

RCTC’s Center for Business and Workforce Education will collaborate with Mayo Clinic’s Information Technology department to develop technical skills training for individuals preparing to attain a Certified Information System Security Professional (CISSP) certification.

Today data breaches are occurring more often, requiring organizations and businesses to increase the level of security within their data systems. CISSP certification is a globally recognized cybersecurity and information technology certification. 

“RCTC is excited about this opportunity to serve one of Rochester’s largest employers,” said RCTC Director of Business and Workforce Education, Jennifer Wilson, Ph.D. “In the state of Minnesota, business and education partnerships are crucial for enhancing a strong training program because it is through these partnerships that allow us as educators to develop curriculum that meet the standards of industry.”

For further information on RCTC’s MJSP Partnership Grant, contact Jennifer Wilson at 507-529-2736.

Established in 1915, RCTC is the largest higher education provider in the fastest-growing city in Minnesota, serving more than 8,000 students a year in credit courses and nearly 3,700 in non-credit continuing and workforce education programs. RCTC combines the best in liberal arts, technical, and life-long learning with more than 70 credit-based programs and over 100 credential options. RCTC’s expansive 518-acre campus includes university partnerships, a diverse student body, and a vibrant student life program. RCTC provides a unique learning environment that offers the feel of a four-year university campus with the commitment to access and opportunity of a two-year college.

 

The Minnesota State system consists of 37 colleges and universities with over 16,000 employees offering nearly 4,000 educational programs to nearly 400,000 students. It is the fifth-largest higher education system in the United States.

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RCTC is a member of the Minnesota State system.

 

 

RCTC CAD PROGRAM AWARDED SECOND CONSECUTIVE GRAUC WORKFORCE INNOVATOR GRANT

(Rochester, MN) Rochester Community and Technical College is proud to announce that its Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) program has been awarded a second consecutive Workforce Innovator Grant from the Greater Rochester Advocates for Universities and Colleges (GRAUC).

GRAUC Board members awarded $1,000 in Workforce Innovator grant funding to the ongoing partnership between the RCTC CAD program and Rochester Public Schools’ CTECH program. RCTC CAD students will continue to mentor CTECH students, assist them in designing and creating on the computer, and teach them how to use three-dimensional printing software. Review Committee members were impressed with the continued collaboration between CTECH and Computer Aided Drafting students and educators. 

RCTC Computer Aided Drafting Instructor Pam Benson received the Workforce Innovator Grant award at the GRAUC Celebration Breakfast on Friday, June 22rd. For further information on GRAUC and its Workforce Innovator grant funding, go to www.grauc.org or call GRAUC Executive Director, Don Supalla, at 507-258-8109.

Pictured in the attached photo are: RCTC President-designate, Dr. Jeffery Boyd; RCTC Computer Aided Drafting Instructor, Pam Benson; and RCTC Interim President, Dr. Mary Davenport. For further information on RCTC’s CAD program, go to https://www.rctc.edu/program/cadtech/ or call 507-285-7557.

Established in 1915, RCTC is the largest higher education provider in the fastest-growing city in Minnesota, serving more than 8,000 students a year in credit courses and nearly 3,700 in non-credit continuing and workforce education programs. RCTC combines the best in liberal arts, technical, and life-long learning with more than 70 credit-based programs and over 100 credential options. RCTC’s expansive 518-acre campus includes university partnerships, a diverse student body, and a vibrant student life program. RCTC provides a unique learning environment that offers the feel of a four-year university campus with the commitment to access and opportunity of a two-year college.

 

The Minnesota State system consists of 37 colleges and universities with over 16,000 employees offering nearly 4,000 educational programs to nearly 400,000 students. It is the fifth-largest higher education system in the United States.

Jeffery Boyd Named President of Rochester Community and Technical College

ST. PAUL, Minn., March 21, 2018 – The Board of Trustees of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities has named Jeffery Boyd to serve as president of Rochester Community and Technical College. The appointment becomes effective July 1, 2018.

“Jeffery Boyd possesses the exact combination of education, experience, and passion for community colleges that RCTC needs in its next president,” said Devinder Malhotra, chancellor of Minnesota State. “He is not just committed to helping students start their pursuit of earning certificates or degrees; he is committed to helping them make it across the finish line. His proven track record of passionate and transparent leadership will serve him well as president.”

Boyd has a reputation as a leader with a vision for the future of higher education and a champion for the mission of community and technical colleges. A first-generation community college graduate, he currently serves Tidewater Community College (VA) as the provost, chief operating officer, and lead academic and student affairs administrator of its campus in Norfolk, which serves approximately 12,000 students annually. Under his leadership, the campus developed new degree and academic options for students including a one-year to completion accelerated Associates degree, an Associate in Fine Arts transfer degree in Music, and a retention program focused on encouraging students to complete 15 credits per semester.

Previously, he served Elgin Community College from 2006 to 2014 in several capacities including associate dean, interim dean, and dean of Business and Career Technologies, and he served the Quad County Urban League as director of education and employment in 2005. He held roles in student services for Olivet Nazarene University from 2003 to 2004, and Waubonsee Community College from 2001 to 2003.

Boyd holds an associate degree from San Joaquin Delta College (CA), a bachelor’s degree from Judson University (IL), a master’s from the University of Phoenix (AZ), and a doctorate in Community College Leadership from National Louis University (IL).

Boyd will succeed Mary Davenport who has served as interim president of Rochester Community and Technical College since 2016.

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Established in 1915, Rochester Community and Technical College is the largest higher education provider in the fastest-growing city in Minnesota, serving more than 7,500 students a year in credit courses and nearly 4,000 in non-credit continuing and workforce education programs. RCTC combines the best in liberal arts, technical, and life-long learning with more than 70 credit-based programs and over 100 credential options. The expansive 518-acre campus includes university partnerships, a diverse student body, and a vibrant student life program. Rochester Community and Technical College provides a unique learning environment that offers the feel of a four-year university campus with the commitment to access and opportunity of a two-year college.

Minnesota State includes 30 community and technical colleges and seven state universities serving approximately 375,000 students. It is the fourth-largest system of two-year colleges and four-year universities in the United States.